National Historic Landmarks

Pauli Murray Family Home National Historic Landmark nomination

Before and after the restoration of the Pauli Murray Family Home in Durham, North Carolina. Photo courtesy of Barbara Lau, Pauli Murray Center.

The National Historic Landmark nomination form is now available for reading! Prepared by architectural historian Heather Fearnbach and Dr. Sarah Azaransky of the Union Theological Seminary, the nomination will be presented on October 18th before the National Historic Landmarks Commission. The nomination represents the culmination of a year-long collaboration between NCWHS, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice.

Sign the petition to support the Pauli Murray nomination here!

Photo courtesy of Barbara Lau, Pauli Murray Center

Sign Petition for the Pauli Murray Family Home National Historic Landmark Nomination

Pauli Murray Family Home National Historic Landmark nomination

Before and after the restoration of the Pauli Murray Family Home in Durham, North Carolina. Photo courtesy of Barbara Lau, Pauli Murray Center.

The National Historic Landmark nomination form is now available for reading! Prepared by architectural historian Heather Fearnbach and Dr. Sarah Azaransky of the Union Theological Seminary, the nomination will be presented on October 18th before the National Historic Landmarks Commission. The nomination represents the culmination of a year-long collaboration between NCWHS, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice.

Update: 10/28/2016: Thank you for your support; Petition of 2500 signatures is now closed.

Photo courtesy of Barbara Lau, Pauli Murray Center

Home of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Everglades Defender, Becomes National Historic Landmark

Marjory Stoneman Douglas houseMarjory Stoneman Douglas was one of the nation’s most significant environmentalists. Astonishing in its breadth, her writing and activism on behalf of South Florida’s natural environment spanned much of the twentieth century and permanently reshaped the national understanding of the Everglades.

In 2014, the National Collaborative for Women's History Sites (NCWHS) and the National Park Service (NPS) began a collaboration that aimed to recognize Douglas’s place in twentieth-century U.S. environmentalism as part of the NPS Women’s History Initiative. [1] In April 2015, Sally Jewell, U.S. Secretary of Interior, designated her lifelong home in Coconut Grove, Florida, a National Historic Landmark. The Marjory Stoneman Douglas House joins about 2,500 other National Historic Landmarks that have been recognized by the Secretary of Interior as exceptionally significant in the nation’s history.

Douglas was born in Minnesota in 1890 and raised in Massachusetts by her mother and grandmother, but she relocated to Florida in 1915. Douglas was immediately captivated by the state’s subtropical environment and vibrant political and social scene. With striking clarity and a sharp wit, Douglas documented the natural and political history of early twentieth-century South Florida in countless articles and poems in a daily column for the Miami Herald. She also joined the community of Progressive clubwomen, arguing for women’s suffrage and conservation. It was through her writing and advocacy that Douglas developed a deep understanding of South Florida’s subtropical environment—its lush plants, diverse species of birds, and, later, the Everglades—as a regional strength that should be promoted and defended.

Read more: Home of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Everglades Defender, Becomes National Historic Landmark

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