National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

 

National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

 

National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

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The National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites advocates for historic sites that center the preservation and interpretation of the important role of women and gender non-conforming individuals as core to the American story.

 

The National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites is 20 Years Young!

Celebrate the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites’ 20 years of supporting and promoting the preservation and interpretation of sites and locales that bear witness to women’s participation in American life.

NCWHS has built the National Votes for Women Trail, a massive project to document the suffrage campaign in every part of the United States in an online database. This virtual repository saves the stories of the women and men who fought to give an equal voice to all citizens in our country. In partnership with the William G. Pomeroy Foundation, we are installing up to 250 roadside markers in towns across the country to share the little-known stories of the fight for the vote. We will continue to develop the database to uncover more stories, particularly those of women and men of color whose struggle for voting rights continued long after the 19th Amendment’s passage in 1920.

What’s next? In partnership with other organizations and individuals, we will collaborate on new projects that further our mission. We support research that illuminates the story of women in American history, and we advocate to preserve the places that tell that story. We are only 20 years young, and there is so much more work to do!

Won’t you join us? You can help us to “right women’s history.” Become a member or make a donation to support NCWHS’ mission and growth. Online payments are secure and processed by Paypal. Check payments can be sent to National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites, c/o Alice Paul Institute, P.O. Box 1376, Mount Laurel, NJ 08054.

Thank you for your support,

Board of Directors
National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

 

Women’s Suffrage, Historic Markers, and Race:

A Statement from the Board of the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites and the Advisory Committee of the National Votes for Women Trail

In this moment of historical reckoning about race, we, members of the Board of the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites and the Advisory Committee of the National Votes for Women Trail, mourn the loss of Black lives—not only the recent killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Elijah McClain, but the historic loss of thousands of others who have died throughout U.S. history, martyrs to a system of white supremacy. We live now with the echoes of these tragedies and with the systemic racism that still pervades our world.

In this context, we continue our work to commemorate those who supported voting rights for women. The Nineteenth Amendment expanded voting rights to more than twenty-five million women, more people than any other event in U.S. history.

As we remember all those who struggled for the right to vote, we also recognize that racism pervaded much of the European American suffrage movement. Before and after 1920, many methods (including legal restrictions, intimidation, and murder) were used to exclude both women and men—especially African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos/x, and Asian Americans—from voting. In 2020, one hundred years after passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, one hundred and fifty years after the Fifteenth Amendment, and despite interim victories such as the Voting Rights Act of 1965, (and its extensions to end discrimination against language minorities in 1975 and people with disabilities in 1982), we continue to face challenges to the right of all adult citizens to vote.  

We recognize that we all share in patterns of systemic racism. Our intent is not to ignore this racism but to open it up for public debate. To leave woman suffragists out of the story because they inherited, benefitted from, and often promoted an entrenched system of white supremacy would be to ignore the complex and pervasive intertwining of gender, race, and class–past and present.  

We work to understand our past so that we can help to create a world of justice and respect for all people in the present and future. 

View our National Votes For Women Trail database! If you would like to add to our growing list of sites, please complete this form.  If you need assistance completing the form, see our tutorial.

News

WCET Greater Cincinnati PBS NVWT and Sewah Studios Segment

| News, Trail | No Comments
Take a tour of the Sewah Studios foundry in Marietta, Ohio, which creates historic markers from coast to coast, including the new National Votes for Women Trail.

Trail Highlights

Erie, PA installs Augusta Fleming NVWT Marker

| Featured Post, Trail | No Comments
A marker dedication for Augusta Fleming was held in Erie, on June 24, in honor of the day Pennsylvania became the 7th state to ratify the 19th amendment. Attendees had…

Partner Profile

The William G. Pomeroy Foundation

| Partner Profiles | No Comments
The Pomeroy Foundation, which is a private, grant-making foundation based in Syracuse, N.Y., is providing grants through its National Women’s Suffrage Marker Grant Program in order to support recognizing historically…

Suffrage Profile

Paulsdale

| State Profiles | No Comments
Paulsdale, a National Historic Landmark in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey since 1992, was the birthplace and family home of women’s rights activist Alice Stokes Paul (1885-1977). Built c. 1800, the…

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National Collaborative for Women's History Sites

The National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites (NCWHS) supports and promotes the preservation and interpretation of sites and locales that bear witness to women's participation in American life. The Collaborative makes women's contributions to history visible so that all women's experiences and potential are fully valued. Be a part of our mission -- Join the NCWHS today!
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Who Was Most Opposed To Women's Suffrage? Why is it so important for today's society? Is the 19th Amendment Relevant Today?
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Join Hull-House for the launch of the special edition art book "Invisible Labors" and a discussion with contributors.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
At the suggestion of WASP veteran Deanie Parrish, the National WASP WWII Museum opened at Sweetwater's Avenger Field in 2005.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
The Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum and the National Museum of the American Latino will best tell those stories here in their rightful place at the center of the capital.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
150 years ago, Victoria Woodhull became the first woman in American history to run for president, at a time when most women couldn't even vote.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
All 50 states in the U.S. have now sent a woman to Washington — and this election cycle saw a record number of women run for governor.