National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

 

National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

 

National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

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Women’s Suffrage, Historic Markers, and Race:

A Statement from the Board of the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites and the Advisory Committee of the National Votes for Women Trail

In this moment of historical reckoning about race, we, members of the Board of the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites and the Advisory Committee of the National Votes for Women Trail, mourn the loss of Black lives—not only the recent killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Elijah McClain, but the historic loss of thousands of others who have died throughout U.S. history, martyrs to a system of white supremacy. We live now with the echoes of these tragedies and with the systemic racism that still pervades our world.

In this context, we continue our work to commemorate those who supported voting rights for women. The Nineteenth Amendment expanded voting rights to more than twenty-five million women, more people than any other event in U.S. history.

As we remember all those who struggled for the right to vote, we also recognize that racism pervaded much of the European American suffrage movement. Before and after 1920, many methods (including legal restrictions, intimidation, and murder) were used to exclude both women and men—especially African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos/x, and Asian Americans—from voting. In 2020, one hundred years after passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, one hundred and fifty years after the Fifteenth Amendment, and despite interim victories such as the Voting Rights Act of 1965, (and its extensions to end discrimination against language minorities in 1975 and people with disabilities in 1982), we continue to face challenges to the right of all adult citizens to vote.  

We recognize that we all share in patterns of systemic racism. Our intent is not to ignore this racism but to open it up for public debate. To leave woman suffragists out of the story because they inherited, benefitted from, and often promoted an entrenched system of white supremacy would be to ignore the complex and pervasive intertwining of gender, race, and class–past and present.  

We work to understand our past so that we can help to create a world of justice and respect for all people in the present and future. 

 

 

The National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites (NCWHS) is a non-profit that supports and promotes the preservation and interpretation of sites and locales that bear witness to women’s participation in American life. The Collaborative makes women’s contributions to history visible so that all women’s experiences and potential are fully valued.

View our newly released “National Votes For Women Trail” database! If you would like to add to our growing list of sites, please complete this form.  If you need assistance completing the form, see our tutorial.

News

NVWT Pomeroy Marker Project: Update and Extension

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The NCWHS and the Pomeroy Foundation is excited to announce an extension of the NVWT Pomeroy marker project to commemorate the women’s suffrage centennial celebrating the Nineteenth Amendment. The Pomeroy…

Trail Highlights

North Dakota Installs 4th and 5th Markers

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The Golden Valley Historical Society dedicated a new historic marker honoring early “Votes for Women” advocates on the grounds of the Golden Valley County Museum lawn in Beach, on Saturday,…

Partner Profile

The William G. Pomeroy Foundation

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The Pomeroy Foundation, which is a private, grant-making foundation based in Syracuse, N.Y., is providing grants through its National Women’s Suffrage Marker Grant Program in order to support recognizing historically…

Suffrage Profile

Frances Willard House

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Frances Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Willard became the national president of Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in 1879, and remained president until her death in…

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#OnThisDay in 1919, North Dakota became the 20th state to ratify the 19th Amendment! Congratulations to North Dakota on this milestone in suffrage history! https://t.co/Jut5CEAI83 ncwhs photo

"Women have been running for president long before women were allowed to vote for the president. Each successive candidate has paved the way for the next, regardless of party or platform." Watch the new guided tour of the First But Not the Last
https://t.co/BJZlO6YAOx."

Frazier Museum exhibit honors suffragists as Vice President-elect Kamala Harris shatters glass ceiling https://t.co/hB3gEQnUmV via @whas11

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National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
(WHAM) - A new statue is being installed in the town of Seneca Falls to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. The statue, titled Ripples of Change, is being sponsored bythe Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission. It features four women whose activism helped to bring women the righ...
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
The 2020 Conservancy Gala looked unlike any others, switching to a drive-in format to celebrate women's suffrage on Saturday.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Let's keep up the good work!! Enter your sites today!
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
December 9 at 6pm CST/7pm EST.
The Centennial Woman’s Suffrage Project, an interdisciplinary group at Southeastern Louisiana University seeking to commemorate 100 years since the 19th Amendment’s ratification, will be participating in a Gallier Gathering panel discussing the project. Panelists include:

Dr. Carol Madere of the Department of Communication and Media Studies will speak on the national movement and laws which have changed to grant women more civil rights.

Dr. Lisa Moody of the English Department will describe the state suffrage movement.

Dr. Elizabeth Hornsby of the Department of Languages and Communication will discuss the black suffragists movement.

This panel discussion is part of a traveling exhibit on suffrage, which was produced through a Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Rebirth Grant, and will be on display at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses from November 30th-December 11th, 2020.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Women joined together at a time when it was believed "woman's place is in the home." They encountered disapproval, but persevered anyway.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Suffrage in Stitches: Celebrating Women's Fight for Political Voice through Crochet - 12/6/20
Katherine Durack, PhD, is the originator of The Genius of Liberty, a series of six-minute suffrage stories about Ohio and the fight for woman suffrage, created in partnership with Cincinnati's Mercantile Library. She serves as Ohio's representative on the National Board for the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association, is a contributor to the National Votes for Women Trail, and is a member of the 2020 Women's Vote Centennial Initiative task force. Dr. Durack has consulted with arts, education, and cultural organizations on Ohio’s suffrage history.
Register here for FREE: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/suffrage-in-stitches-tickets-129713311005