National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites

Let's put women's history sites on the map!

The National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites (NCWHS) is a non-profit that supports and promotes the preservation and interpretation of sites and locales that bear witness to women’s participation in American life. The Collaborative makes women’s contributions to history visible so that all women’s experiences and potential are fully valued.

View our newly released “National Votes For Women Trail” database! If you would like to add to our growing list of sites, please complete this form.  If you need assistance completing the form, see our tutorial.

News

NCWHS is hiring! Historian/Project Managers & Historian/Researchers

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Historian/Project Manager: National Votes for Women Trail The National Collaborative of Women’s History Sites seeks a historian to work as Project Manager  supervising a team preparing roadside marker nominations as…

Trail Highlights

Successful GoFundMe Campaign

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A sincere thank you who supported our GoFundMe campaign! Because of your support, and an incredible number of in kind donations by talented women, we reached our goal of creating…

Partner Profile

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation and Collaborative Partnership

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation has entered into a partnership with the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites to identify, save, and educate the public about American women’s history through women’s sites. Our…

Suffrage Profile

Frances Willard House

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Frances Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Willard became the national president of Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in 1879, and remained president until her death in…

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National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites shared a link.
March for Life theme borrows page from suffragist centennial
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites shared a link.
A hundred years ago, Rhode Island lawmakers ratified the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites shared a link.
Tell us where women made history by sharing a photo and short description of a place the world should know about.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites shared a link.
2020 marks 100 years since women granted right to vote.
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites shared a link.
In 1848, more than 300 attendees gathered in Seneca Falls, New York to discuss women’s rights. In the decades that followed, suffragists gathered, discussed, spoke, wrote, performed, paraded, and protested to give American women the right to vote. They waged a determined battle for greater agency,...
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
Ringing of the Bells for the Passage of the Equal Rights Amendment

96 years ago, on July 21, 1923, Alice Paul stood in our church pulpit and declared that the "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." This sentence is also known as the Equal Rights Amendment. This week, Virginia the 38th State, will ratify this amendment and it will be added to the US Constitution. To celebrate this historic event, the day after the passage, we will ring the church bell throughout the day 96 times, one for each year it has taken to add this amendment to the US Constitution.

Church bells have often rung in times of celebration throughout our Nation’s History. The sound of a bell is the sound of freedom and liberty. Today it is also the sound of the shattering of the glass ceiling, making a pathway toward equity. We invite others to join us, the church will be open throughout the day for people to ring the bell. If you can’t journey here, we invite you to ring the bells in your community from Selma, to Stonewall to Seneca Falls.

Let the bells of our Nation ring out to celebrate that all people have been recognized in the US Constitution. This amendment includes men and women. This amendment includes LGBTQIA. This amendment includes every race, creed and color. It states clearly that the rights shall not be abridged and genuine freedom for all becomes our new destination.

From: The First Presbyterian Church of Seneca Falls, NY
23 Cayuga Street, Seneca Falls, NY 13148
315.568.6636/firstpres13148@gmail.com
www.fpressf.com